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Full text of "In Ruhleben Camp"

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InRuWeben 




Sunday, July 11* 



1915. 




RUHLEBEN CAMP 
SCHOOL 



COMMITEE: 



Messrs S. A. Henrickson 7/4; A. Reynolds 23 B; 
A. N. Pennington TA; A. W. M. Platow 2/25; 
A. H. Bodin 11/7; A. C. Ford 10/13 (Chairman); 
♦♦<► S. M. Hart 10/16 (Secretary). ♦♦♦ 



Some 50 classes are now at work 

giving instruction in languages 

and literature, philosophy, en- 

gineering, mathematics and 

Commercial Subjects, The 

Secretary attends daily 

from 3 — 4 in the af- 

ternoon in the shed 

between Bar- 

racks 2 and 3. 



Teachers urgently needed: 
especially in modern languages. 




i 



i 




Ruhleben Camp 



N^3. 



July 



1915. 




|HANKS to you all for buying up our second 
number so readily and enabling us to hang 
out the lt SOLD OUT 1 ' board two hours after 
the issue of the first copy. We are sorry 
we have no more left to satisfy those who 
did not secure a copy on Sunday, but the 
offer, posted on our office window. to buy back copies of 
No. 2 at 40 pfgs. each has been responsed to in only four cases. 
With regard to our finances, may we explain that the 
Newspaper & Printing Department working together only 
just manage to cover expenses. The paper itself does not 
absolutely meet its expenses. Now our next issue we 
ivoulcl like to make a special Bank Holiday number de- 
voted solely to Camp stories and pictures. This will entail 
extra expense in the respect of our cover and an increase 
in the number of pictures and consequently the price of 
No. 4 to appear on Aug. 2 n <l will be 30 pfgs. Will the 
Camp grumble? Of course it will! Will the Camp buy 
it? Of course it will! 




WE throw a bouquet at Mr. Peebles-Conn and Mr. Green 
for their delightful promenade concerts. 



WE throw a bouquet at the Entertainments Committee for 
arranging the "prom." concerts on Sunday. 



WE throw a bouquet at ourselves for giving the devil his 
due. — 

WE throw a bouquet at Mr. Butterworth for having so 
successfully negotiated the Casino steps. 



^"'Ill"' 1 1" I |M "I| I |I"I|,||I ,, I Hl" l"l| l Hf"l|„l' l, l|, 1 l""'l I ||l ,, l|„|l ,, l|| l |l ,l l| ll |l ll l|„|l"l| l ,|l ,l l| Ilnll"!!,,!!"!!,,!""! 

\arts & scienceI 

l UNION f 



% THE POPULÄR LECTURES on Technical subjects will 1 

C continue as usual at 10 a. m. on Wednesdays and J 

C Saturdays. " = 

J THE POPULÄR LECTURES on Colonies and Foreign | 

J Countries from the commercial and economic point £ 

J of view will continue on Saturdays at 3 p. m. i 

l OTHER POPULÄR LECTURES will be arranged for 1 

£ Wednesday at 3 p.m. \ 

^ • s. 

J A SPANISH CIRCLE under Mr. Barry has begun work, f 

\ meeting every Friday at 3 p. m. for discussion, § 

€ reading and conversation in Spanish. \ 

| A FRENCH CIRCLE will be formed shortly. f 

I THE CLASS IN CHINESE (MANDARIN) has begun J 

%_ with a large attendance, and meets on Mondays, ~= 

ff Wednesdays, Thurdays and Saturdays, 9 — 10 a. m. \ 

€ BY ORDER OF THE AUTHORITIES,- | 

J no one is allowed on the 3 rd Grand Stand between the £ 

~= hours of 8 p. m. and 8 a. m. Any infraction of this rule £ 

\ may endanger our whole teaching facilities. £ 



j THE LOFT OF BARRACK 6 J 

% has beert handed over. 1 

flull"!!,,!!''!!,,! |||I"I|,||I"I|„|I»I|„|J«I|„|I«I| M ||I 1 1 |l"l|| l |l' l l|„|l"l| ll |l l, 'l,|l" l 'l ) ||l l "lMl" , l|| l l<" 'll ( |l"l||,|l"l|„| 



CHE APER ENTERTAINMENTS. 

jJn Interview with the Chairman of the Entertainments Committee. 

Y^ HE Entertainments Committee is a body appointed by the 
^ Captains' Office to look after the entertainments of the 
Camp. The present members are Chairman : Captain J. Thorpe, 
Vice-Chairman : W. Butterworth, and W. Crossland-Brigegs, 
B. E. Tapp, A. Roker and F. Ch. Adler. 

Having received several letters on the subject of the Camp 
Entertainments and also having had complaints as to., the non- 
representation of several societies on this body, our representative 
called lipon the Chairman of the Entertainments Committee, 
Mr. Thorpe and asked him to give us soms idea as to the work 
the Committee was doing. 

With regard to the representation of the Arts & Science 
Union and the Irish players, the two bodies instanced by our re- 
presentative, Mr. Thoipe informed us that it was never the idea 
that all bodies working for the entertainment of the Camp should 
be represented on the Committee and he thought that such bodies 
and the Camp as a whole might rely upon the fairness of the 
Committee in dealing with all questions which came before them 
without bias. He himself, for instance, was a member of the 
R.D.S., but that would have no influence upon his actions as 
Chairman of the Committee. 

Asked what expenses the Committee had to bear, Mr. 
Thorep explained that they were just undertaking the enlarge- 
ment of the stage so as to improve the view from the sides 
of the house, which would involve an expsnditure of at most 
M. 350 (£ 17-10-0). In addition to this they had to meet 
the weekly expenses amounting to M. 30. This included payment 
of several stage-hands ; the cleaning of the hall was not in 
their province. The preparation of tickets for the various shows 
amounted to M. 10 a week, certainly not more. 

The following arrangements have been made with regard 
to the booking of the hall : Monday night, Arts & Science 
Union ; Tuesday night, Debating Society ; Wednesday night, being 
no longer occupied by the Divine Service, to be held free for 
any mcidental need, Thursday, Friday Saturday and Sunday 
would be allotted for dramatic productions. 

The Entertainments Committee has now a balance in hand 
amounting to about M. 2000 (£ 100). Asked whether this 
had been put into the Camp Fund, Mr. Thorpe said it was 
credited to them by the Camp Treasurer. 

With regard to the prices, these at present were Stalls 
75 Pf, which produced M. 82.50 a night; Circle 50 Pf., 



producing M. 20 a night ; five rows of the pit (there are some* 
times seven or eight) at 25 Pf., producing M. 30; this means 
that one house produces M. 132.50, Mr. Thorpe agreed that two 
such houses would in most cases pay the cost of production. 
"As You Like It" for instance was, according to Ruhleben 
Standards, a very expensive show, and this cost M. 420 to 
stage. But it must be remembered that this provided for an 
entirely new outfit of "curtain scenery" which will probably 
be used over and over again and then used up in the form 
of dresses. 

In answer to an inquiry as to whether it would not be 
possible to reduce the prices on the last two nights of the 
shows to 30 and 20 pfgs. Mr. Thorpe said he did not think 
this would be practible as the Camp would wait for the cheap 
nights. 

Speaking quite personally and not in any way on behalf 
of the Committee, Mr. Thorpe said he saw no reason why pre- 
sent prices should not in the future be considerably reduced 
for the whole four nights. It must be remembered he added 
that as time went on, properties were accumulating and conse- 
quently the cost of productions decreasing. Musical shows would 
of course cost more and there might possibly be shows which 
would involve the hiring of costumes from Berlin, so that in 
these cases an exception would have to be made, though in 
case of need they might draw on the big reserve they had 
piled up. Asked as to whether the procedure se-t up at the last 
concert given under the auspices of Messrs. Ludlow and Lindsay 
of charging entrance was to be followed in future, Mr. Thorpe 
replied that was an exception, as the group of gentlemen who 
gave the concert stated that they wished to defray certain ex- 
penses. The expenses in question were the repainng of Mr. 
Ludlow' s violin, and the renting of the grand piano for the 
penod of one month. The takings of that concert amounted, 
he believed, to about M. 190. The cost of renting the grand 
piano would not, said Mr. Thorpe, in future be borne by the 
entertainment committee. The committee had also decided that 
in future no charge shall be made for entrance to concerts. 

T. A. B. 

(WE have asked for a Statement with regard to the Variety 
Show given for the benefit of the Variety Artistes in the Camp, 
but unfortunately, it had not comento hand at the moment 
of going to Press. It is also interesting to note that the Irish 
Players applied forleave to reduce their prices for the Per- 
formance last Sundav and the Entertainments Committee met 
them with a refusal. — Ed.) 



or\d^ide 




6 



INTERVIEW WITH THE OLDEST 
INHJiBITANT OF RUHLEBEN. 

Our Camp Commissioner chats With Mr. A. N. Oldun. 

WHEN our Special Commissioner called at Barrack 20, 
Mr. Oldun was busily occupied with a microscope, but 
the venerable gentleman cheerfully expressed his willingness to 
be interviewed. 

"This'' he smilingly said, indicating the microscope "is my 
favourite hobby ; at present I am searching the papers for news. 
I can't say I have been very successf ul as yet ; but lt passes 
the time, and with a bit of luck I might come across something 
one of these days ! 

Oldest inhabitant ? Why, I should jolly well think I am ! 
I've been here ever since there w a s a Ruhleben ; yes, sir, ever 
since the Camp was started ! Changes ? Yes, there' s been a 
tidy few changes since I first came here. You would hardly 
believe, for instance, that when I was a young man they used 
to play rounders over there where Uncle Toms Cabin Stands 
to-day ! It was all open ground then — except where Pondside 
Stores stood, and that was all water — acres of it. We 
youngsters, as we were then, used to bathe there, and many's 
the time I've dived for sardine tins and acid drops ! But it's 
all dry land there now, as you can see for yourself. 

"I used to get postcards in those days, but they have 
dropped off now, and so have the writers, I expect. Not that 
I ever took much stock in them ; the only kind I used to get 
had "freigegeben'' on the front, and "love from Aunt Emma" 
on the other side ; but they're a great comf ort, no doubt, to 
some. 

"Accidents ? Well, I must not complain, but of course 
I have had my share. I remember one day, the man who 
slept in the bunk over mine dropped half a loaf of bread 
on my head . . . but I came round in an hour or two, and 
here I am to-day, alive and well. It's a poor heart that never 
rejoices, as the sailor said when he found a beef tea adver- 
tisement in his billy-can ! 

One of the most cunous sights I ever saw in this Camp 
was a woman ! Yes, sir, a real live woman ; and I saw her 
as plainly as I can see you now ! There's plenty would bear 
witness that what I say is true, only they are all dead and 
gone ! But she did not stay long, poor thing. I think that 
some of these wild men you see about the Camp scared her; 
you know the kind I mean, — long hair and short breeches. 
Anyhow the woman cleared out, and has not been seen here 



since . . . As to musical matters, you say? Well, in my 
time we were satisfied with Harry Lauder on the gramophone 
and a bit of Hallelujah chorus on Sundays ; and that's about 
all there was. All we wanted, being old-fashioned folk, was 
a bit of melody with a dash of sentiment, but they teil me 
the public taste has changed, and that we must not choose 
our own music, but have it dished out to us by some of these 
high-falutin young gentlemen that talk so much and do so 
little. But I see there's still a few of the old way of thinking 
left, judging by the crowd that I saw at the promenade concert 
the other day. Real good populär music it was, and played 
in first-rate style too, and didn't it go down with the people, 
too ! A regulär Peebles- Concert you might call it ! . . . I must 
have my little joke, you see! 

"From what I can see of it" resumed Mr. Oldun "there 
will be a very special assortment of language experts let loose 
when the Camp breaks up. Leaving out the naturally gifted 
ones, — and there's a good lot of them, let me teil you in 
Ruhleben, — there's classes for Arabic, and Chinese, and good- 
ness knows what eise. A friend of mine started a class for 
Camp policemen once; his idea was to teach them polite 
language, but he died of a broken heart, poor chap ! I see the 
latest scheme is a Nil d'Esperanto class, and I wish them 
luck. Talking of language, I once heard a few remarks made 
by a man who) dropped his Christmas bottle of beer and broke 
it ! But were too near the Inf ants' Dormitory, so I don't think 
111 say any more about that. 

What our patriarchal friend' s next topic would have been, 
it is impossible to say, for at that moment a messenger arrived 
with news of his release. The fountains of diplomacy had at 
last begun to run ! Alas ! they bore with them the veteran's 
life. Stunned by the crushing force of such an unexpected blow, 
and seeing, in mental vision, the uprooting of old associations 
and habits, Mr. Oldun feil forward in a swoon, and never 
spoke again ! 



Here in the sweltering heat I sit 

In weary woes immersed 
And strive upon some scheme to hit 

To rid me of my thirst. 
Oh who can teil my grief profound 

Beyond man's power to think 
With Scotch and Irish all around 

And not a drop to drink ! 



8 



r^ 




IN the name of the Camp may vve congratulate our Hamburg 
friends on their happy return to Ruhleben. By the way, >did 
the Champagne taste as good on the way back as it did on the 
way out ? 



THE sportsmen in the Camp may 'have a very pleasant 
surprise soon. What is it?^ Olh, but we mustn't say, but just 
one tip ! Don't take that tennis racquet along to the Exchange & 
Mart. 



BY the time this number is on sale, our local Bond Street 
will be in füll svving and we hope to offer our readers a fasci- 
nating serier of Shopping articles. We are engaging the Ser- 
vices of one of the most populär actresses of the day to write 
this column for us so it will not only be helpful but eharming 
as well ! 



HAVE you heard any really good Camp jokes? If'you have, 
do bring 'em along for our Bank Holiday Number and don't 
teil them to everybody first. Also, if you sketch, bring your 
drawings along too. But if you have written a serious article, 
calculated to do the Camp good, don't bring it along. Keep it 
for No. 5. NoL 4 is going to be sheer unadulterated Fun — and 
note the capital F. 



IT has suddently dawned upon us that 
the Exchange & Mart, smart business 
people that they are, have done us down 
and bought up all the spare copies of 
No. 2. Anyhow if you want a copy, apply 
to them ! 



WITH regard to "Our Society" founded by 
Mr Butterworth and a number of his friends we 
are able to offer the Camp the following parti- 
culars. „Our Society" consists of 50 members who 




(Continued on page 10) 



10 



have stumped up for the (bui kling of the shed at the back of Bar. 7. 
They have arrang<ed for the erection of this shed mainly in 
order to lend it to other people. Thus from 8 — 12 and from 
3 — 7 the premises (ahem !) are at the disposal of the various 
homeless dramatic societies straying around the Camp, for rehearsal 
purposes. Between 12 — 3 the "paying fifty" bring along their 
Camp chairs, drink coffee and hold sweet commune. Tvvo evenings 
in the week will be devoted to a Symposium — a long word 
that means that an opportunit}' will be given to members to 
expound theories, the exposition of which has hitherto been 
squashed by the 5 — minute rule of the Debating Society. 

So altruistic seem the aims of the new body that we are not 
sure whether "Our Darlings" would not be a better name. 



WE draw the attention of our readers to the interview in 
this number, with the Chairman of the Entertainments Committee. 
We feel we shall have the sympathy of the whole Camp in 
taking the stand we do on the subject of eheaper Entertainments. 
There is absolutely no reason for the amassing of funds in the 
Camp and the fact that there is a balance of 2000 M. to the 
credit of the Committee is alone sufficient evidence that there 
has been mismanagement somewhere. We should like to see 
the prices of Entertainments half what they are at present. 
Does the Entertainment .Committee realise that as a result of 
their policy the same 500 people have been enjoying the »com- 
fortable seats ever since entertainments started for there certainly 
are not more than 500 who can afford 75 Pfgs. for a seatl ata' 
show. Now be it remembered that most of the other seats are 
hardly worth having! 

Again, if there be any surplus, <why does not the boidly 
giving the show state the object to which profits are to be 
devoted, for instance, an advertisement like this would rejoice 
our hearts. 'The Speckled Band" Three Extra Nights ! As Exten- 
ses have now been paid, all takings will be devoted to reducing 
the price of margarine for tvvo days." 



"THE Nursery" is apparently in great spirits for we have 
received the following plaintive story from a reader: 

"The other day, whilst wandering in the vicinity of the 
"Boys" Barracks, my thoughts as usual high up in the moon > 
I feit my sleeve violently pulled. Coming down to earth again ; 
I discovered two cheeryfaced youngsters evidently eager to 
show me the and outs of their new quarters. Linking arms they 
guided me round the sheds. At the extreme end of the enclosure 
we came across twenty or thirty other boys lying about on the 
sand in all attitudes of studied idleness, leaving only a small 
passage for us to thread our way to their Barrack door. An 
unwholesome silence prevailed, which should hav*e aroused my 
suspicions. ^As the iboys showed no inelination to increase the 
width of the footway, my conductors, courteously I thought, 
stepped to one side and aliowed me to pass through first. Alas ! 
I took a step towards the passage and my foot crushed through 
the paper and sticks which, covered with a layer of sand, hid a 
trench füll of water. As I hurried back to my Box to change 
into dry clothes, the screams of the delighted kids rang in my 
ears, already the booby trap was foeing prepared again for 
another victim with a faith in the innocence of boyhood as 
strong as mine — — was. 



11 



THE following are the theatrical fixtures for the next month 
or two: — 

The Private Secretary July 8 th. 

Der Graf von Luxembourg, July 15 th. 

Scenes from Dickens, July 20 th. 

(produced by the Debating Society) 
Three Irish Plays. July 22 nd. 
L'enfant Prodigue, July 29 th. 
The Silver Box, Aug. 5 th. 
The Entertainments Committee has also passed for rehearsal 
"Fanny's First Play", "The Master Builder" and "The Importance 
of Being Earnest." 

IT is reported that the martins and swallows in the vicinity 
of Barrack 2, held a meeting recently and v elected one of their 
number as president, considering it inf ra dig to be under the 
captaincy of a Swift. 

WE are in a position to deny the report that the gentlemen 
of Caledonian persuasion in No. 2 Barracks are Publishing a 
Joint work on Iron Ore. 

THE Camp Librarian has handed us the following interesting 
details with regard to that most useful section of Camp work : 
"The Library was started on Monday 14 th November, 1914 with 
a collection of 83 books, received from the American Ambassa- 
dor and Mr. Trinks. Requests to members of the Camp jto 
contribute boo'ks, met with a ready response. In addition books 
were received from the Seamen's Mission at Hamburg, from 
England (particularly from Mudies Library and their clients) and 
from friends resident in Germany. We now have over 2000 
English boo'ks, 2000 English & American Magazines, 300 German 
Books, 130 French books. 

During the month of April last, the number of books lent 
was 6395 an average of 256 books per day for the 25 days 
the Jibrary was open. While for the month of June the number 
was 6326, an average of 253. 

At the present time 1897 of the interned are members pf 
the library. 

. A catalogue of the books is now in the hands of the 
Printers, and those desiring a copy of same are requested to 
hand in their names at the printing office. We intend to issue 
monthly Supplements of books added. 

Gifts of French, Spanish and Italian books to the Library 
would be highly appreciated. 



WE wish to congratulate Mr. Peebles-Conn and Mr. W. N. 
Green on the success of the promenade concerts and would 
like to put in a plea for the sale of the programmes, After allj, 
to buy a programme is a very small recognition for the very 
great pleasure the m|usicians give U3 and the least we 'can 
do is to provide their music. 

OUR Canteen Editor teils us that during the summer months 
butter and margarine will be sold by the pint. 

In future, a complete price-list of articles usually in stock 
will be hung outside the canteen. Should there be no price 
opposite any particular article, it means that the said article 
is not obtainable on that day. SO PLEASE DO NOT ASK FOR IT, 



12 



REMERCIEMENTS 



(PVe hawe received foHowing little Iribute fiom a french \eader) 

"Ruhleben Camp' quel est ton äge? Ne crains donc rien, marche toujours 

Un mois Monsieur, plein de courage- Tu possides tous nos amours; 

"Ruhleben Camp", je suis heureux En cet exil, ta vive flamme 

De te savoir si valeureux! Rechauffeia nolre pauvre äme. 



Te demandes si tu nous p'.ais? 
Compte tous ceux qui desoles 
Vinrent ouir ä ta fenetre : 
"Tout est vendu, je le regrette" 

Bien eher ami ton prompt succes 
N etonne point. car tu le sais: 
Quand l'homme veut, quand il 

travaille, 
II est vainqueur dans la bataille. 



Faire le bien! quoi de plus beau 
Quoi de plus doux, quoi de plus 

haut? 
Et quand viendra la Delivrance 
On gardera ta souvenance 

Toi, tu mourras, mais tes bienfaits 
Dans tous les coeurs seront graves 
Et ce sera ta recompense 
Piedit la Muse en vers de France. 

Sanssouci. 



T wonder, if many of us will miss, 
*• When the day of freedom dawns, 
This Camp which like a chess-board is, 
Whereon we are but Pawns. 

Sometimes a Pawn is taken away 
For hours — at least 24! — — 
And when I think it over, I say: 
I don't want to play any more. 



P. H. 



GENTLEMEN'S TAILORS X 

& ^ 

BREECHES ^C> ^ 

MAKERS ^\K* 



& 



^ 



<s 



<p 



# 



v> 



^ 



LONDON 
PARIS 
BERLIN 



New brauch now opened at 
Ruhleben belween Barrack 2 & 3. 




13 



CRICKET 




Ji Review of the Season up'to*date by 
"VMPIRE" 

". . . . and Flanneled Fools".Kipnng t 



HAVING seen the form of the various teams on several 
occasions, one is now better able to pick out those teams 
whose chances seem rosiest for the honours. 

The cricket has on the whole been of a high and attractive 
Standard, although the actual results have not been close enougjh 
to Warrant any intense excitement. 

Very few games have ended contrary to expectations ; the 
surprises being the defeat of Bar. 3 by Bar. 12 and the victory 
of Bar. 4 over Bar. 8. 

The expected great match of the season — "Nigs v Nobs " 
— proved rather a fiasco. The ,,Nobs" declared their innings 
closed after scoring 395 runs for the loss of 6 wickets, and 
not content with that disposed of the "Nigs" twice, Ist inns 
for 42; 2nd inns for 113. No less than four members of the 
Bar. X team scored over 50 runs — Masterman 129, Gilbert 
78, Harrison 63 and Belmont 57 (not out) — ths first named 
batted beautifully and faultlessly. Gilbert 5 for 21 and Mas'er- 
man 4 for 11 shared the bowling honaurs. 

Thanks to an excellent innings by Simmonds Bar. 2 were 
able to defeat Bar. 9 by 29 runs, his total of 61 was most 
creditable. 

Your old friend Jack Brearley scored a most attractive 85, 
for Bar. 4 v Bar. 7, seeing that Bar. 4's total was only 145 
Jack must have set to work with a will. Despite his good inten- 
tions, nobody was able to assist him and his side lost by 80 runs. 

Bar. 5 has taken second place in the highest aggregaUs 
with a total of 326 v Bar. 13. Campbell 106, Nash 59 and 
Baker 57 being the chief scorers. This is Campbell's second 
hundred this season, having made 117 for Bar. 5 (2nd XI) 
v Bar. 6 (2nd XI). Out of Bar. XI's total of 291 the follo- 



14 



wing were the big scorers : Haynes 83, Nurse 59, Mills 50 
and good old Steve 46, \ve were glad to see our old frbnd 
knockmg up a score and can sympathize with him that he 
didn t get his "50 . 

Johnson 108 (not out) batted in good style agamst Bar. 1. 
WTien he was playing rounders we said he could hit, Im - 
the Bar. 1 bowlers agree with us. 

Thanks to an attractive and forcing partnership belv 
Fachiri and Dixon, BaiTack VII were able to collect 225 ran? 
v Bar. IV. Dixon got 90 (not out) and Fachiri 63. 

The following big scores have been made this seascn 
CLeague matches onK 







/*< D 


ivision 












J. C. Masterman 


(Bar. 


10) 


129 


v. 


Bar XIII 






L. Johnson 


VI 


8 


108 


r. o : 


out) 


V. 


Bar. 


1 


J. T. Campbell 


» 


5 


106 


n 


» 


V. 


■ 


13 


R. Stewart 


T) 


5 


100 






v. 


*t 


6 


H. L. Dixon 


ff 


7 


90 


i) 


ii 


V. 


* 


4 


J- Brearley 


11 


4 


85 






V. 


» 


! 


R. Haynes 


ff 


11 


83 






V. 







J. B. Gilbert 


w 


10 


78 






V. 


»» 


13 



2 nd Division 



J. T. Campbell 


(Bar. 5 2r 


'd XI) 


117 


v. 


5-. 


6 


W. Hanton 


ff 12 


» 


92 


V. 


•* 


11 


H H. Swift 


■ io 


* 


89 


V- 


T 


6 


A. E Dodd 


ff io 


* 


78 


V. 


ff 


13 


W. Lowe 


r, 10 


n 


64 


V. 


ff 


13 


G. Mills 


ff 11 


r 


63 


V. 




12 


L. Boole 


n 3 


ff 


59 


V. 


ff 


12 


S. Raine 


7, 3 


i> 


59 


V. 


Tl 


11 



BEST BOWLING FEJtTS 
Ist Division 



S- O'Neill 
H. Kemp 
R. Haynes 
R. B. Brown 
Steve Bloomer 
Barber 
H. Raper 



(Bar. 



8 


6 


9 


6 


11 


5 


9 


7 


4 




9 


7 


12 


7 



6 wickets for 3 1 runs v. 1 



11 


y> 


V. 


12 


11 


n 


V. 


12 


17 




V. 


12 


U 


-■ 


V. 


6 


24 


ff 


V. 


•2 


24 


■ 


V. 


3 



BOWL1SG (2*4 Division) 



L. Muscott 


Bar. 


<) 


8 


wickets 


for 


3 


runs 




4 


M. Francis 


ff 


7 




« 


» 


3 


TI 


V. 


8 


A. Maw 


» 


" 


■ 


» 


ff 


3 


ff 


V. 


13 


V. Edmunds 


r> 


10 


5 


» 


« 


" 


ff 


V. 


13 


r-dmunds 


» 


10 




ff 


•i 


7 


ff 


V. 


5 


Edwards 


r 


- 




»7 


■ 


8 


ff 




- 



15 



Date 






R 


esults up 


ito*date. 










18 Bar 


. 10 


— 395 (6 


wkts.) 






Bai 


-. 13 


— 42 


& 


113 


19 „ 


7 


— 225 










99 


4 


— 145 


& 


100 {5) 


20 „ 


8 


— 264 










99 


1 


— 25 


& 


35 


21 „ 


2 


— 139 & 


73 


(1) 






>> 


9 


— 110 


& 


98 


22 


3 


— 125 & 


54 








») 


12 


— 115 


& 


65 (8) 


23 ," 


11 


— 291 










»9 


6 


— 68 


& 


54 ( 7) 


24 „ 


5 


— 326 










>) 


13 


— 28 


& 


37 


25 „ 


10 


- 164 












- 7 


- 86 


& 


59 2) 


26 „ 


8 


— 57 & 


88 








99 


4 


— 180 






27 „ 


2 


- 151 & 


72 


3) 






99 


1 


- 44 


& 


64 


29 „ 


9 


— 120 










99 


12 


- 21 


& 


39 


30 „ 


11 


— 109 & 


62 


(4) 






» 


3 


- 92 


& 


67 








• 


Second Divisio 


n 










Date 


Team 


Ist 




2nd 






1 


eam 


Ist 




2nd 


18 


7 


50 




60 


$i 






4 


14 




46 


19 


2 


141 




8 








8 


26 




88 


20 


9 


130 












12 


33 




34 


21 


3 


121 












3 


119 






22 


13 


35 




47 


iß) 






6 


21 




48 (5) 


23 


10 


174 












5 


30 




70 


24 


7 


101 












8 


17 




82 


25 


4 


137 












2 


79 






26 


11 


• 98 












9 


38 




83 


27 


3 


196 












12 


95 






29 


5 


166 












13 


13 




68 


30 


10 


109 












6 


64 







,We would like to remind our cricketing friends that spiked 
or nailed boots and shoes are not allowed, either on the pitches 
or at the nets. It is for your own sakes that we give you thls 
little reminder. 

Barrack 3 has two of lts first team members on the 
"casualty" list : Gudgeon has sprained his ankle and Fisher 
has sustained a nasty cut on the jaw. We wish them spcedy 
recovery and hope to see them back "in the ranks" before long. 

One would like to ask the Cricket Association if it is 
not possible to hurry things up a bit between the finish of one 
innings and the beginning of the next. Of course we are in 
Ruhleben and our supplies of matenal are rather lim.t^d, bat 
still it should hardly be necessary to have quite such long 
intervals. After all our time is also limited, so let us make 
the best of it and not dilly-dally. 

D. K. GREENE. 



THE next man who calls at our office with a design for 
the binding of our annual number will be murdered. 



HOMESICK gentleman is vvilling to exchange a tin of ship 
biscuits for bottle of perfume (patchouli preferred). 



16 



•o«o«o«o»o«c»o«oj 
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July 22 



o*o*o«o«o*o«o*o*to£>( 

o*o*o«o«o*o«o«o*|Cl] 

OlOlOlOlOlOlOlOlCt 



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Uli 



Three Short Irish Plays, from 
the ADliey Theatre, DUBLIN. 




by W. B. Yea s 



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by Lady Gregory 




by Lady Gregory 



o»o»o»o«o»o»o»o« 
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For times, prices, etc see bills in the Camp 



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17 



THE MODERN DICK TURPIN. 




w 









H/\T d'yu mean by puttin' 

my n m3 in the piper, I 

aint done nothin' to yu. My 

nime's Dick 'Alpin, but every- 

body knows oo you mean by 

"William Halpin", an it aint 

good enough. Yu may think it's 

a joke, I don't. Ab well, k's 

orl very well to say you want 

ter interview me but I wart to 

know wbat you're agoin' to do 

abaht that tbere Botice m the 

^^^^ ^^J^^_ pipsr. I got my karikter (o look 

J%— n^^rjTiTWfcl 1^1 a ^ er same as anybody eke. I 

a:nt afraid of anybody in tbis 
'ere bloomin' lager, Captains an' 
all. I may be liiVe but Im 
lough. 

Well, look ere, make it two- 

f'ifty — just arf a dcllar, eh? 

That aint too mucb mister, for mind yer tbat aint a nice 

tbing to 'ave in the piper. Well if" you're goin' to tike a 

picture of me I don't mind corllin it Square. Ow mach of the 

piper wdl it tike up ? 

Oh yes my nime's 'Alpin arl right, Dick Alpin. Ever 
'ear o' Dick Turpin ? Well I got my nims from im. E 
rode a bloomin' oss to death an' I've rode a bloomin' bike 
to death! There's nothin' like cyclin' mister, 111 n2ver g.ve 
it up. It's my first 'obby, cyclin is. When I do die, I onV 
opes as 'ow 111 drop dead on the old bone-shaker. 

'Ow did I start cyclin', well I was tired o' towns Orl- 
ways a bloomin' bobby round the corner ready to shart at 
yer. No rest, no liberty. Im all for libsrty I am. I started 
work in Crosse & Blackwell's jam fac'ory, but I socn 
chucked that and took to cyclin'. 

I said cyclin' was my first obby, cause I've got two 
others. My second 'obby is studyin Natcher-out on the lcnj» 
road that's where I like to be ; Yer know I aint one o' these 
ere poets an' I carn't write a book tho' you appears to think 
Im kypable of it but I teil you I've got sperrit in me an' 
I aint ^afraid of any man in this lager — Captains rn' all. 
Well, what was I talkin' abaht — them bloomin' Captains 
always tikes me orf the track. Oh yes, I was sain' I warnt 
no poet but all the sime I sye I'm the riebest man in this 



18 



Camp cause I know exactly the sort of Life I wants an' 
I ave the means ter get it. What's that ? Whats me means? 
\X eil just I ve me old bike an I m geayine fond o that old 
scrapheap. Well wot if I ave sold er io: fifteen mark 111 
ave er back afore were out o this lager I teil yer. An 
then I ve me \vits. I aint no fool you know. We ve a lot 

learned blokes in this Camp professors and poets and hact^rs 
an wot not, but look ere mister, you put any of em on a 
bike in Tottenham Court Road, give em 4 10 in th:ir 
pocket an teil em to get to Ell out of it and bring back a 
stamped card from Monte Carlo in 45 days. Ow many of 

em ud do it Mister? Ow many? Wye not wan ! 

Want to ere sumfin' abaht my rides. Well I done Lands 

End to John of Groats five times in nine weeks, that's sumf'n' 

like 4600 miles. Then I got tired of England, you carn't get 

further than John of Groats can yer? So I says, well 111 

ave a Look at the contmong an a bloomin long took Im avm'.. 

Is this my first time across the channel ? No fear, I went 
to Paris once — on the old jigger agin. "Ad a go}d time 
.too. You aint bin in the Moulin Rouge. Oh you 11 ave to go 
there. Saw Carpentier there too got 'is nime in my book. 

Ow do I get on, well I as "London to Monte Carlo'' 
cn a placard on me bike an' as I passes through towns I calls 
at the Cinema an' usually the manager or someone can turk 
English then I teils the audience all abaht my journeys. So:ne 
on it 's true mayhap some on it aint but any' ow all of its 
interestin'. Then I takes a collection an' there you are. Then 

1 calls at all the hoteis an when there s Englishmen lhe:e 
I can always pitch em the tale abaht old London. Bless yer 

art 1 can bring tears to their eyes wi my patter abaht out 
cf the sound o' Bow Beils. Its my fird obby what elps me 
to do that. 

Oh yes, I got a fird obby its studyin' Yuman Xatcher. 
I teil you there s only one fing ats interestiner than Natcher 
an that's Yooman Natcher. I can read men l.ike a bo^k an' 
like books most on em aint w orth readin' twice. I got all 
the men in this Camp weighed up — Captaim an all. I know 
who sputtin' on swank an' oo's somebody outside as well as 
somebody in ere. 

Adventures, well aint five times from Land s End to John 
of Groats adventure ? An if that aint adventure, wot do yei 
call a year in a bloomin concentration Camp? If it aint ad- 
venture I dunno wot it is. It aint wot yer calls : appy ome 
life is it now mister ? 

I remember when I was in Monte Carlo I sat down 
with 2 francs 50 and got up with 85 francs. That 's wot I call 

(Continued on page 2J) 



19 





dt^'\ 







SO ME SPECK LED BAND" SKETCHES 

Mr. H. F. Hamlyn as "ARM/TAGE"; Mr. C.J. Pearce as "ALI"; 

Mr. J. H. Thorpe as "Mrs. STAUNTON"; Mr. E. J Davies asSHERLOCK HOLMES"; 

Mr. F. Ch. Adler as "Dr. RYLOTT". 



20 



seein' life mister. No, I didn't get into the swanky casino- 
place, 'cause yer see mister, Monte Carlo's like Ruhleben, 
they keeps the Casino for the Nobs. But yer can ave some 
fun there I teil yer. (I remember one morning abaht 2 o'clock 
getting into Abbeville an I was fair done an' so was the old 
bike. I stopped at a baker's shop an' e says somethin' abaht 
a Hotel de Ville. Well, I didn't parley vous extra well at 
that time an I thought it was some hotel where I might find 
some English an get a night's lodgin. Well when I gets there 
I finds it only a bloomin' Perlice Station. Well, the door 
was open an' inside a little lobby was a ambulance. That 
was enough for me, I just left the old bike out on the pave- 
ment an' into that ambulance I slips an' in two ticks I was 
away in Byebye land. I was woke in the mornin' by the 
Ell of a row and there's arf Abbeville an' all the perlice 
force round my old bike readin' the placard on it an' askin' 
where the mad Anglais was. Well, I was tired so I let em 
look around Abbeville for a couple of hours an' then out 
I pops. I seen some funny faces in my time — my mister, 
but I never see such a place as Ruhleben for funny faces 
I saw a blöke yesterday — oh well as I was syin' I never 
seen such a funny gesisht as those old French bobbies pullsd 
when they saw me roll out of their old ambulance in tl~.e:r 
own police Station. But in arf a tick I 'ad em dyin' of 
laughin' and when I left the town I'd got 5 francs out of 'em. 
That's enough for now mister ? Well look 'ere carn't you 
go on wiv it for number four. Mind yer, I can give yer 
amusin' stuff an it ud be a good advertisement for me when 
I get back to London. Why you 'aven't even seen my book, 
look 'ere — (at this point the interviewer fled, he knew Mr. 
Dick's book of old.) 

T. A. B. 



THE Captains say, in reply to A. B. Bar. 12 that it is 
not officially forbidden to keep gold-fish in the manger, but 
they Ihink it would be unhealthy for the fish. 



Overheard: — "Pretty good for B, 50 not out." "That's 
nothing-looks as though I'm going to be 90 not out." 



"SAY boys, we're going home !" "Is that a fact ?" — 
l No, it's a prophecy." 



A certain member of Barrack 2 is now very careful to 
nse before 6.30 a. m. 

SEND y ur love-letters lo the Ruhleben girls by meaits of ihe RUHLEBEN 
EXPRESS DEEIVERY, to be organised next wcek in our Camp. 
Slam s to be had from our special messengers. 
Poslage, both for lelters and cards, one halfpenny. 




TfieJbebcdinqri ] ) Sveieiif 



DEAR INKSTAINS. "^^i 

Last Tuesday we went to the Debating Society to hear 
"Anecdotes". Of course we hoped for something really spicy 
and just — oh, you know — shivered with joyous anticipation. 
Of course there would be nice little after-dinner stories, frillies, 
corsets, ample bosoms — and all the rest. Not a bit of it. 
Dear, decorous Buttersootch got up on his pedestals and prated 
about William Morris and Christabel Pankhurst to start with. 
Afterwards a gentleman told us how the Aliens Immigration 
Act worked or rather didnt. I was yawning by then, but Buskin 
nudged me and I woke up to find a sailor in possession of 
the platform, giving a demonstration of the working of the 
gong telegraph of a coaster. We knew all about it before 
!he left the bridge I can teil you. Things were getting as 
dull as a Gravesend fog when a gent told us how he undressed 
in an hotel bedroom only to discover a lady between the sheets. 
What did he do ? Walk out of the room of course. You 
should have heard the yells that went up. They were all about 
[a ruminant climbing an arboreal stem as far as I could gather. 
Finally we were told a ghost story and went out with our hair 
on end. The public applauded vociferously and unanimously 
called for another evening of anecdotes. 

"Buskin" said I, "how is it the house enjoyed this 
wretched stuff so much?" "Well, it's this", he replied — 

we re not an intellectual race and what's more were THE 
mugs of the British Empire or we shouldn't be here. Of course, 
we PRETEND to enjoy the brainjuice of the supermen, nobody's 
got the courage to say that they don't for fear of b3.ing styled 
"hignorant and hunedicated" with capital H's b 4 y his neighbours, 
blit give us an entertainment needing no mental strain to suck 
it in and we applaud it uproariously. There's the piain truth." 

— And so to bed. Yours f aithf ully, 

THE MAD HATTER. 



22 



■ 



■ 



DaoaaoGoan 



rush to 




(First shed in rear of Bar. 7 opposite Bar 5) 

, to consult Mr- Josephson? ===== 

Because he knows 



Because 



how to make their Ruhleben Lod- 
gings cosy, comfortable and healthy. 



Mr. Josephson, who is a London builder with 
25 years experience knows best how to do it. 



We are not cheap-Jad^s 



but we are prompt and reasonable. 



■ 



m 



iiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiKimmiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiH 

MISS MOLLY M'GINTY SENDS US THE 

UNSOLICITED 

FOLLOWING/TESTIMONIRL: 

Frivolity Theatre, 
_ Ruhleben W. 

DEAR SIRS: 

jilgy brought me a packet of 
your really splendid and excellent 
toffee to the stage door last night 
and I feel I MÜST really write 
to teil you how good I think it is. 
So wholesome and pure. Itreminds 
me of my last tour in England 
where I AL WA Y S ate your 
Toffee de Luxe. Isrit it just 
splendid heing able to get it at the 
Ruhlehen Stores here? 

Yours üery sincerely 

MOLLY MGINTY. 

ENGLISH TOFFEE: 2 packets 15 Pfg. at Ruhleben Stores. 




23 



CREAMS. 

npHAT year everybody was 
■1 singing it. "Oh, don't play 
'In The Shadows', wailed Wil- 
kie Hard, 'Tve heard lt bz- 
fore", and the people grinned, 
and went on playing it : in fostid 
alleys, wrung out of drunk n 
barrel- organs by swarthy, sober 
Italians : in our public parks, 
conjured up by impossibly gra- 
ceful military conductors — the 
far-flung ideal of the city dam- 
sels — : and at Regattas, on the 
most tmderly b2aut.iful of all 
rivers, where a shy English 
breeze ruf fies and smooihei the 
surface of the stream, sighing 
through the poplars on the eyot, 
and catching at the 
^^ muslin on the breast of 

an English girl. Prcne 
on the gaudy cushions 
of the punt, she basks 
in the admiring hcmage 
of her partner ; and 
when he, restless under 
the spur of his uncoi- 
fessed hope, with a 
secret longing for quiet and seclusion, murmurs 'S'awfully 
hiot! What bout tea?" she nods her sleepy, initiated consent. 
The music follows them in, wisps as they glide down- 
stream, the basket of good things to eat and drink bl'nks 
in the July sun with! benevolent promise, and the slaady 
little backwater, that he has had in his eye all day, 
iand which really knows all about them, opens its hanging willows 
to welcome them in as they slip over the darknened water, 
"mto the shadows" . . . 

In the corners of the ball-room girls and women chatter, 
their gay dresses and quick movements set off by staid groups» 
of men : the f loor is so bright that each separate light is ref lected 
in a long spear. The pause was a long on2, and impatient 
glances are thrown up to the orchestra, when suddenly, out of 
a muffled murmur, one of Strauss' waltzes flings its first bar 
of electric passion across the room. The groups break, eyes 




frßiiHnUiihiitimnulu t 



24 



light up in mutual recognition and anticipation, the ball-room 
becomes a living moving unity, and the music jerks its shower 
of restless desire over the revolving figures, guiding} tlieir 
submissive steps, rising, falling, leading up to ecstasy, sinking 
back to prose. How can those fellows stop to drink and 
smoke, when there are girls like Alice willing to tremble to your 
clasp as the music steals their brains and makes their limbs 
languid. Don't stop to analyse the sweet delirium, Stripping 
its mystery into words she would not like to hear; take and 
enjoy it while it lasts. Her ups move ; she is speaking — Too 
warm? Had enough? Well, there's always the garden — 
cool, dark, secluded — where there's no-one to hear — if 
you whisper, and are close enough . . . 

They've walzed on the floor and they've walze d up the 
stairs, and sung their charming nonsense right through to the 
finale ; and now its all over ; and the theatre doors are vomiting 
forth a motley crowd, where everyone wants the same taxi, 
first. Well, she's enjoyed it immensely ; and so has he ; and 
so have they both together. The street looks cold and in- 
hospitable — unreal, too, after the jolly world they've just 
lef t ; he thinks of his lonely room — a batchelor's is a dog's 
life, anyway. Now if — ? he wonders if — and he looks 
down at her, and at the half question in his eyes she sinks 
her own, and takes his arm (she pretends it is the cold) oh 
so little — tighter. His hand plays nervously with the coins 
in his pocket. Can he run to it?, Oh, damn the consequences. 
"What about supper somewhere ? I know just the place" — 
"Oh rather; that'll be jolly! 'So with a nonchalant sweep ot 
his arm, as if he did it every day, he summons a taxi, and 
they run off, with the Count of Luxembourg ditties still 
buzzing in their ears, "over the hüls to Fairyland." . . . 

Is it any wonder we like the Promenade Ccncerts ? 

H. M. 



=111: 



LOOK OUT FOR THE RUHLEBEN CAMP EXPRESS DELIVERYf 

Letters or postcards sent all over the Camp. 

Stamps can be purchased from our messengers. 

Post in the boxes to be affixel in the barracks> and at all impoitant 

points ol the Camp. 
WHY WASTE TIME in rushing around Camp looking for your friends? 
Drop a note in the R X. D. letter boxes It'll only cost you 1/3 d. 



25 

A REJILLY ENGLISH EÜENING. 

ENGLANDS turn at last! The A. & S. U., a small 
collection of persons misguided enough to waste the pre- 
cious hours of their stay in Ruhleben in cultivating their own 
minds and those of other people (as far as they are allowed 

— this unenglish notion of training supermen is, fortunately 
for us all, kept within strict bounds by the powers that be) 

— this long-haired brigade advertised an evening of English 
Songs & Morris Dances. The dull weather and a vague idea 
that the Brothers Maurice were going to dance, filled the Hall 
with all sorts and conditions of men, and sub-men, the supermen 
having reserved the middle for themselves. That made the sub- 
men at the back feel pretty sure that whatever jam they were 
going to get would contain an intolerable deal of powder, 
so they kept up their spirits by cheering the brainy contingent as 
it filed to its appointed place. 

Mr. Pease led off with a short account of old English 
Song and Dance under growing Interruption from a section of 
the audience, presumably from that part of the Camp which has 
no f riendly interest in things English. Mr. Tapp nobly exerted 
his best vocal powers and quelled them for a time, so that 
we heard Mr. Pease' s recital of song and dance — titles and 
village names, and feit a little homesick. Then followed song 
and dance, and we were back in merrie England : Not the 
modern England which would fain eure the depression brought 
<on by Puritan respeetability and the strain of buying and selling 
to the best advantage by imputing Yankee, French, Russian, 
South American and any other weird foreign amusement. As 
the evening wore on, the Ruhleben palate, aecustomed through 
it be to the brilliant piquancies of the "Empire" and the thrilling 
horrors of the "Speckled Band" began to find the eider, junket 
and bread & butter — kind of fare quite nice for a change. 

The later dances were rigorously aecompanied, the re- 
petition of one was asked for but not conceded (casinoists are 
sown very thinly in the A. & S. U. and you have to save 
yourself if you are to dance in the vigorous old English way 
on soup) and the last song, High Germany, got right home, 
and was repeated, with a hearty tribute to Mr. Johnson the 
singer, and his aecompanist Mr. Bainton. Mr. Pease had a 
hearty call and thanked the audience for the way they had 
joined in. The usual wrangle about the merits of the show 
followed on the parade — one thing could not be denied, that 
a new note had been Struck in "Engländerlager, Ruhleben" 
entertainments — new because pure English. 

H. S. HATFIELD. 
(Do it again please! Oftenü — Ed.) 



26 



THE RUHLEBEN CLJIRKSON. 
How We Dress Our Jlctors and Actresses. 

GIVEN several yards of crepe, cotton and thread, som-s old 
cardboard boxes, a few biscuit-tins and some strln? and 
glue make dresses for one Roman Emperor, two of his courliers, 
Christian captives, two female ditto, a few incidental people, 
a number of gladiators, several soldiers, a crowd of males 
such as an editor, an oxdnver, a slave, a call boy and last 
but not least one lion, very much alive ! 

This was the problem which was placed before Dr. Lech- 
mere in the early days of our captivity and the time allowed 
for the Solution thereof was three weeks. Ruhleben ought to be 
proud of the Performance for not only was the work completed 
within time but the examiners, the audience awarded füll marks. 

In those days the work was done in various boxes amid 
all the hurly-burly of box life and the recriminations of non 
dramatic members thereof. Now we have our special premises 
— it may be to the casual visitor from the outside they might 
seem to bear more resemblance to a cow-shed than to a costu- 
mier's department, but judged by our humble Ruhleben Standards, 
they are palatial. 

The shed was for rehearsmg also so that the usual morning 
scene is — top end of the shed, rowdy rehearsal of exciting 
scene, in one corner of the rehearsal section sits the president 
or Secretary at a small table putting the final touches to a 
Ruhleben setting of the music of Gounod's Faust. Behind h.m 
is a large table manufactured out of a floor board and trestles 
lat which the dress-makers are at work, while finally at the other 
end of the shed is the carpenter's bench. Just as printers get 
into the habit of quietly talking to one another heedless of the 
roar of the great rotary printing-presses so our costumiers have 
acquired the ability to sew, sew, sew oblivious of all inter- 
ruptions or eise dealing with the same in a manner so curt 
as to discourage the intruder for further advances and without 
ceasing work for a moment. 

Interruption are never lacking, some are amusing, many 
are exasperating. Of the latter is the search for a sleeve which 
has been taken from the table and which is finally run to earth 
in the box of a man who had visited the shed and "thought 
it a remnant — just enough to cover my shelf." Here for 
the benefit of the Camp in general may I say the R.D.S. 
NEVER has any stuff suitable for covering shelves. Then the 
-musical man wants the sewers to abandon their work to bind 
his 44 type-written copies of such and such a play or the car- 

(Continued on page 28) 



27 




/^VeäanB i£e desic/mr- ofifve wonderful modern 
cnturnes xxiom ßythe'&diesoftfieJy-iooIityJk^tre 




?mm 



Teva eftie Creatiom 

sßcfimere for -tfuiJrivoLviy TheatrepfoductiotiS. 




2)T/eehm£re , 4ke. ptoneer frs tu mrer of%cA/e6en. TSfp drem) 
(Lndmclffi ii-ikeCian. S-jäiyouHkeit '. 



JtXftAlston as 'enid'in 'Spickled Sarid . 7/Ü$ 3f?ss 
tt^bfelland's %jJiie£enJ{aii.arpxeae. : 



28 



penter comes in half laughing, half angry, at the cool cheek 
of the man who has handed him five yards of twisted wire, 
two handfulls of sawdust, a pot of glue, a strip of socklng 
and some gold pa.int with the request (made without the vestige 
of a smile.) to manufacture the fiery serpent. 

A member enters blushingly beanng two chemises (what 
ever they may be — Ed.) adorned with blue and red ribbon 
and a pair of petticoats (don't mind confessing, have hsard 
that phrase before — Ed.) with frillies. These he explains 
his landlady packed in his bag by mistake. The gift is accepted 
thankfully, but the member had a bad time of it for the next 
week or two. 

The producer of some shöw or other will drop in to dis- 
cuss the possibilities of manufacturing a pair of high-hseled 
patent leather shoes with buckles for his heroine and there is 
something like a panic when it comes out that no hair-pins 
have been ordered. Here the carpenter comes nobly to the 
rescue and with his wire cutlers and a Huntley and Palmer's 
biscuit tin, produces a dozen or so hair-pins — not exactly 
things of beauty, but they do hold the hair together and the 
heroine s coiffure is all the heart could desire. Finally in 
strolls a leading lady to try on. Fifty minutes late of course, 
for our Ruhleben actresses enter finely into the spirit of leading 
ladyships. First to see ito the lady's anatomy, for not merely 
has our Camp Clarkson to build the dress for the lady but 
he has previous to this to build the lady for the dress. The 
try-on is disappointing for the skirt does not "hang". In our 
happy Camp fashion, the lady's figure is altered a little, taken 
down here, added to a little there. Just a touch or two of make 
up is irresistible for all are keen on seeing the finished article 
— . and there we have a blushing Christian maid of Neros 
time, a little minx of a mill-girl, a robust lady of the middle 
class, a flighty society dame, a lady explorer or the darling 
of her old daddy's heart, as the case may be. 

It is interesting to note the details of the various costumes. 
The lion, for instance, was built of one cocoa tin, half a sack, 
some wire, and a wooly mat (the latter was a real sacnfice 
to art, for it had been the pride of the box.) The armour 
for the Roman officers consisted chiefly of cardboard furnished 
by the Parcel's office, some paint and a lavish allowanc3 of 
string. Lavinia cost the Society five metres of white muslm, 
three metres of red silk ribbon and eight metres of gold braid 
— the total cost being at the outside M. 4.50. The cheapest 
costume ever made in the Camp was that of the slave in "An- 
drocles & the Lion" which consisted of two metres of red 
sateen, nero cost M. 7. — to dress. 



29 



Sometimes a dress plays two roles, that of Enid in "Strife", 
for example, which was identical with that of the Cantesn 
Girl in the first Revue — only on its second appearance it 
was altered and worn the other way round ! Madge's dress 
was the result of a tour round the boxes of two barracks. The 
costumier's bill for "Strife" was less than M. 8. — . 

For "As You Like It'l Mr. Weiland joined the firm 
and help was necessary, for there were no less than twenty-:even 
dresses to "create". It is amusing to note 
that in all twenty-seven there was not a 
single button, hook or eye or pin, all being 
made to simply slip over the head. The 
material was crepe or sateen and the whole 
cost under M. 100. Rosalind's costume ran 
up a bill of M. 2.35 and one regretted the 
society had not invested another 65 pfgs. 
in her tunic. Her hat and shoes were made 
from the remnants left after her other gar- 
ments had been cut out. 

Lady Cicely in "Captain Brassbound" 
cost M. 6. — - while the Arabs were dear 
at the same price. 

In wrestling with the question of modern 
dresses, Mr. Weiland came to the fore and 
for "The Three Plays" produced two tets 
of mourning with hats, one evening frock, 
two flapper's dressers and one old lady's 
go-to-party get-up at a total ccst of M. 30. — -. 

The last word in Ruhleben creations is 
that shown on our illustraticn and was worn 
by Enid in the "Speckled Band". It would 
have done Paquin justice though the pr.ce 
would have astonished the worthy firm — 
it was M. 12.50. 

So much for the R.D.S. creations tut 
these are not the only delightf ul feminines the Camp has seen. Un- 
doubtedly the Irish girls have contributedmcre to the "England, 
Home & Beauty" sickness in the Camp than any others, and these 
Dr. Lechmere produced in one d a y , the material not arriving 
from Berlin until the night before the production. The secind 
Irish play, "Mrs. M'Ginty's Lodger" was dressed by Mr. Pat 
Caleb, who despite the fact that this was his first attempt in the 
dressmaking direction turned out six charming frocks and pet'i- 
coats and one cape. The total cost was M. 63. — - and it is 
Mr. Caleb's boast that not a Single pin was necessary to a'd 
his dresses in their "sit\ 




Suggested Commemorative 

Fountaln to be placed in 

Trafalgar Square. 



30 



Each of the eight ladies of the Revue Chorus ran up 
a dressmaker 's bill of M. 10. — each, while Marie Lloyd s 
two costumes were equally "expensive ". All were designed by 
Mr. Roker and made in the Camp. 

Does the Camp reahse what all this means ? It is not 
merely that \ve have had our pleasant evenings at the iheatre. 
It means much more, it means that to the credit of the R.D.S. 
must be placed a great deal of what \ve call the English 
spirit, the joy of tackling difficulties and the greater joy of 
Coming out on top of them which has done so much to keep 
the Camp smiling. 

By the way, do not show this article to your wife when 
you get home or you may get into severe hot water for not 
having learnt a little useful dressmaking. Still, on the other 
hand, vou mav show her what dressmakers bills really ought 

to be. " SPINTHO. 



THE RUH LEBEN " WUNDERLAND". 




"BARNEV 



iN view of the recent 
development of boxmg 
that has occured in the 
Camp, we welcome with 
interest the news that 
has reached us of the 
formation of a Club with 
a strong Committee to 
take the matter in hand 
and regulate same. We 
recently spent a most 
enjoyable couple of 
evenings at the estabhsh- 
ment locally known as 
"Wonderland , controll- 
ed by the "Cobbler . 
This is situated be- 
tween Barracks 4 and 
8, and was well patro- 
mzed the evening we 
were present. Amongst 
the regulär patrons 



31 



whom we noticed lolling in their deck chairs were such well- 
known lopal celebrities as Mr. Whitehead (Brummagem), Dr. 
Rutterford (The Irrepressible) and Mr. Boler (The Orator), 
Capt. Toffee Cocker (he of the pull) and mfany others, grouped 
all around were the various combatants and their supporters. 
The bouts we witnessed were certainly interesting in their 
variety, comprising such contrasts as Mr. Allason (No. 2 Bar- 
racks light weight) and the diminutive "Captams Office-boy 
(without badge). Others 
taking part were"Tnckle 
Barney of football fame 
and the veterans were 
nobly represented in 
Messrs. E. Conne 1 L 



and Smith. The former 
is an old frequenter of 
the ring and has fought 
against such knownboxers 
as Jerry Thompson & Alf 
Connell or Connor, as his 
fighting name is. They 
would have put many a 
youngster to the blush and 
much can be learned in 
watching their fast work 
etc The bouts are three 
in number of one minute 
and were admirably con- 
ducted. The Club we 
understand will provide 
sound tuition at a very 
low charge, and the en- 
trance fee is to be limited 





Mr. TRECHMANN 

IN HISSTRAIGHT 

LEFT LEAD 



'Jru^ 



to one Mark which in view of the advantages to be gained 
should be well within the reach of our prospective "Carpen- 
tiers". Once the sanction of the authorities has been gained, 
competitions will be organised which we hope to describe later on. 

The evening's entertainment concluded with a frisndly bout 
between two of our Sports Committee, who, in identifying them- 
selves with this new branch of sport, gave it a good send-off 
and rounded off an evening's sport which seamed to be gene- 
rally appreciated. 

A,* HERSEE. 



32 



THE IRISH PLAYERS. 

Mrs. M'Ginty's Lodger. 

EVERYONE goes to a Performance by the wild Irish, 
looking forward to a jorry evening and they get it. We 
wish to make our humble apologies to Mrs. Mary M'Ginty fcr 
not having immortalised her buxom form in our illustraticn 
pages but if she gives us another opportunity she shall not 
escape. Mr. Smyllie's play was a somewhat bare scaffolding, 
but the players successfully covered its skeletonlike properties 
with their broad humour and uproanous farce. Naturally we 
all feil in love with Molly and, by the way, Molly played 
excellently. Her insidious glances would have well become a 
member of the first row of the chorus at the Gaiety or at 
Daly's and as for her auntie, he was so good that one looks 
forward with great expectations to seeing him in "legitimate." 
We hope the R.D.S. will take the hint. Algy was — er — 
well Algy and the Skin-the-Goat, his dear old natural seif. 
Mr. Smyllie is to be congratulated on his producing capabilities 
— ' an it takes a harbitrary one to manage then dnsh. Really, 
we hope the Irish crowd will do it again, and so does the Camp. 



S. 




Russian Tailor 

Grand Stand No. 1. 

(Next door to Catholic 
Chapel) 

ALL WORK DONE 
PERSON ALLY. 

ESTIMATES FREE. 

Home adress: 
Barrack 11, Box 26. 



A. Weinberg, 

Barrack 6, Box 14. 



WATCHMAKER 

Repairs done cheaply. 



The Ruhleben 




Barrack 5 B. 

originated & conducted by 

MORTIMORE HOWARD. 



Do you want to buy 

anything? 

Hcve you anything 

superjluous, anything 

you dont want, or any 

Bi thing you wish to 5e//P ™ 

Put it on the Exchange & Mart 
Register without delay. 

Our motto: KEEP MOVING. 

lust & fUüwu ' P T j°a,y- 

it v | I a small brown purse conlaining a 
LUül . Jittle money, but a lu-y which is 
valued. Rewärd] Box 10, this paper. 



33 




THE HYPOCRITE. 

This is the real reason why Jones went up into the loft. 
I call him Jones, though I trust I have painted him clearly 
enough to be recognizable to everybody. He did not merely 
give up his place in Box 21 to a sick man, as everybody 
believes, and I can stand his hypocrisy no longer. I should 
like to add that the fact of his having beaten me in one of 
the finals on Empire Day has nothing whatever to do with 
my making public his disgusting acceptance of a falsa position. 

He came to Ruhleben Jßter than the rest of us. The 
captain brought him into the box one night in December. 

"Here's a new man, Brown, a Mr. Jones from Berlin. 
Give him Schmidts bed, will you ?" Then adressing Jones : 
"You' 11 soon get into the run of things, though it does look 
a bit queer at first. If there is anything you want, money, 
clothes, casino pass, just let me know. Letters ? Yes, Brown, 
will teil you all about that. So long then." 

Brown, who was the only man in the box at the time, 
acted as host. 

i "Sorry to see you here", he said, "but it's not so bad. 

We're a pretty comfortable box altogether. There is Jameson. 
He sleeps over you. This is your bed" and he pointed to the 
lower bunk under the window. "Then there is Sturgeon, an 
Australian and Heppelt, a quiet sort of — — " 

"Who do you say ?" asked Jones, turning pale. 

"Heppelt. Comes from Berlin. Do you know him ? A 
tailor, I believe." 

"Yes, that is — er — no. At least, I don't think — — " 
and Jones buried his face and his confusion in his bag. 

Did he know him? Ridiculous question, when he had at 
that very moment in his pocket-book a bill due to that very 



Wk, 



34 



gentleman. As soon as Brown had left the room, he pulled 
it out to have another look at it by the light of the forbidden 
candle, hoping against hope that there might be some mistake. 
But no, there it was : S. Q. Heppelt, Tailor. Then followed 
a lengthy statement of Services rendered ; item, a pair of 
stnped trousers ; item, a spring overcoat, and largest item of 
all, the total M. 421. — . He gave himself up to despair. Was 
ever anyone in such a hornble predicament ? To be locked 
up in the same horse-box as one's unpaid tailor ! Burying his 
face in his hands, he groaned aloud, and just at that moment 
who should come in but Heppelt himself. 

"What's wrong ?" he asked. 

Jones jumped up as if shot through the heart. "Im the 
newcomer to take Schmidts bed", he stammered. 

"Pleased to meet you. My name is Heppelt " and he looked 
at Jones inquiringly. 

"I know, I mean — er — I don't know — That is, 
of course — mine's — er — Jones" he mumbled, think^ng 
every moment he would be recognized, and half expecting to 
be dunned on the spot. He forgot, poor fool^ that though a 
man has only one tailor (unless he's very hard up indeed), 
a tailor has many customers, and that even in Berlin, there 
are several Jones. ( 

Heppelt looked at him with surprise, then put his cunous 
behaviour down to the fact that he was not yet accustomed 
to the new surroundings. 

"Cheer up", he said, "you'll soon get used to Ruhleb;n." 
Im sure it's very kind of you, Mr. Heppelt." 

"You can drop the Mister, here, you know." 

"Certainly, sir." 

"Oh! hang it, I did not mean that." 

"Queer beggar, this new chap", he told his roommates 
later. "Don't quite know what to make of him." 

They none of them did. He liked, according to his own 
account, to take his meals in the open air, to watch rain and 
dust-storms from the Grand Stand, to get up early and go to 
bed late. 

"Anyone would think you were frightened of us" Heppslt 
laughed one day "or that you owed us some money. And not 
noticing Jones' hornble contortions, "As a matter of fact, it s 
the other way about. Im a bit short myself, and was wondenng 
if you could lend me M. 5. — for a day or two. 

Jones looked at him in dismay then slowly and silently 
pulled out his pocket-book and handed over a bill. 

"It's awfully good of you, I'm sure", said Heppelt, b~t 
the other was not to be deceived. Heppelt had recognized 



35 



him and was going to eat him up piecemeal. He shuddered. 
What could he do ? He could only try and lengthen the process 
by keeping still more out of the other's way. He rrmst hide 
from his horrible persecutor. That was all that was clear 
to his dazed mind. There happened to be a sick man in the 
loft. He volunteered to give him his bed, and the same day 
they changed places. That is why Jones went up mto the loft. 
One of his most fervent admirers by the way, is Heppalt, 
but that is because he never asked for his M. 5. — back. 

GOVETT. 



99 



IN RUH LEBEN CAMP" 

The Comments of our Contemporaries on our Coming into the World. 

" — • — — — QUITE the funniest thing we have read 
since one of our numbers in 1859." 

PUNCH." 

"WIR müssen hierdurch anerkennen und bestätigen, class 
durch das Erscheinen unseres neuen Konkurrenten die Ver- 
breitung unseres eigenen vorzüglichen Blattes wirklich gefährdet 
wird. 

B." Z. AM MITTAG." 

"WE hke the serious literary Standard of our new con- 
temporary, we bow towards it and wish it luck in its nzw 
venture. 

COMIC CUTS," 

— — — THE second number of In Ruhleben Camp', 
though of a high literary and artistic Standard, strikes us as 
being dull and seems not to be capable of writing down suffi- 
ciently to its public. 

QUARTERLY REVIEW." 



"THE new fortnightly entitled 'In Ruhleben Camp' is 
ABSOLUTELY THE MOST brillant production of modern 
journalism — — we have ever had the pleasure of perusing. 

T. A. B. in IN RUHLEBEN CAMP." ' 

'WE have read worse magazines. 

ARTS & SCIENCE Union Journal", 
(thanks very much — we . feel bet'.er !) 



36 



A TllVE TALE OF LOüE AND DEVOTION. 



(T!z±*~-.m 



Vi 



' (OR THE'RO- 
MANCE lOF OUR 

PRINTER'S 

CATALOGUE 

OF DRAWINGS.) 



SCHÖN . 
BiN ICH NICHT 




TSJOWthehand- 
some and gal- 

lant Marmaduke 

loved the fair, the 

beautiful Aramintha 

with all his heart but 

her stern and noble 

parents forbade Ara- 
mintha evermore to 

set eyes upon the 

devoted Marmaduke 

and flung him in- 

continent from their 

portals. Thereupon 

Marmaduke with his 

heart at breaking 

point, throwmg him- 

self sobbing passion- 

ately on the bosom of his fnend 

sought counsel of him. 

Leander, the fnend of 

his youth , counselled him 
thus: "Go! travel for a 
while, Old Horse, and 
forget the fair form 
of this maid or eise come 
back with such renewED 
ardour that every ci- 



tWStö tadel will fall before 
thee Stern parents will 
yield and thy life will ^ 





37 





flow with milk and honey. Marmaduke with 
heart now somewhat soothed though not yet 
healed, said "Leander! that 's a damn good 
idea! Thou seest before thee a man whose 
heart, truly never more can beat. Yea! I will 
hie me forth to Cooks and buy a ticket! I will 
go to Hüll, Hell or Halifax! Nay! I do but 
thmk I will go to Germany and see where 
things are MADE, perhaps some occupation 
may beguile my weary heart the while!" 

Marmaduke hied and bought his ticket £' 3 " 1 1 ' 6 3 /i (with 
3 rc * Class Hotel accomodation) he travelled 
to Folkestone and braved the 
perils of the North Sea, 
reaching the foreign Strand 
at last in safeLy. The hot 
August day, the babble of a stränge 
tongue, and the heat of Berlin s 
pavement to his feet fatigued 
him so that he retired to 
his lodgement and slept 
to be aroused ere an hour 

had passed by a hand 
on his shoulder and a 
voice in his ear "Mein Mister! too 
Detektif s are here ! Your land is at war 
with ours! — — — My friends, you 
know the taleü! Eventually Marma- 
duke came to Ruhleben where the ever- 
faithful Aramintha sent him out of her 
pocket-money and unknown to her stern parents many parcels. 
Marmaduke loved her the more, while C/o Aramintha 's loca 
chemist many "Kriegsgefangenensen- 
dung" letters arrived from Marmaduke, 

For 35 years this lasted and then 
Aramintha still young and blooming 
led the now released Marmaduke to 
the altar and lived happily ever afterwards, H. B- M. 











38 

Keffers io iße Gdiior 




ALL letters to the editor must be accompanied by name and Barracl^e 
Number of send er, not necessarily for publication but as a guarantee 

of good faith. 

Dear Mr. Editor : 

Im angry and I th.ink I really have a just complaint to 
make. I want tö know on what grounds the Vanety Show 
artistes justily the fact that they took the profits of 
three whole nights to themselves and put it in thsir own pockits 
whilst using the Hall which is loaned to the whole Camp in 
order to earn it. The (artistes get their five bob a week relief 
just the same as I do and all the rest of us do when they 
need it. Why should they have a benef it ? But the worst 
feature of all is that not only did they take the whole pro- 
fits of these three nights, but they raised the price to M. 1. — 
which kept us five-bobbers (the major portion of the Camp) 
out of the Hall for three nights, turnin^ it into a second 
Summer House Club for the time being. If the merchants 
and men who run the Canteen and all the parcel-post, library 
postmen, workgangs, etc. (and these people really do work for 
the whole Camp) start having bsnsfits, where WILL wc 
get to ? ? ? Yours truly 

FIVE BOB A WEEK. 



Sir, ; 

The importance of the facts dealt with in your issue of 
27th June is such that I trust you will allow me to make 
some observations upon them. For the purpose of this letter 
I will take the financial statement which appears on page 47, 
as being part of the article in question. 

This statement, which is dated lOth. April, bears no date 
showing the period with which it deals ; nor are any balances 
brought forward from the previous statement. I assume that 
it is complete in itself, and that it Covers the first quarter 
of this year, ending on 31st March. 

Among the receipts appear two items, MIO, 401 and M69.000 
respectively, but neither of these can be considered as part 
of the Camp Funds. They are amounts which have been ad- 
vanced by the British Government to prisoners who stand in 
need of financial assistance. They have no more connection 
with Camp finances than have the amounts which reach . pri- 
soners through the British and German post offices. We are 
concerned only with money which is raised in Ruhleben from 



39 



immates in the Lager, and with the contribution of the Brit'sh 
Government for Camp purposes (amounting to M. 22,000). 
The amount raised either by direct taxation, such as parcels- 
fees, or by indirect taxation, e. g. canteen profits, procesds 
from entertainments, concerts, boiler receipts, etc. reaches a 
very substantial figure. Clearly, the people vvho subscribe this 
money are entitled to know what becomes of lt, how it is 
spent, and what is to be done with any surplus that may remain 
from time to time. 

For some reason that I have never been able to com- 
prehend, this explanation has never been forthcoming, and the 
financial statement which appears in your pages does not, I re- 
gret to say, shed much light upon the matter. Mr. Jones' state- 
ment that to give a detailed account of the disposition of the 
Camp funds would entail a large amount of "unnecessary ana- 
lysis" would not be listened to in business circles, and would 
probably involve the dismissal of the cashier bold enough to 
make it. 

That the profits derived from the Camp itself are con- 
siderable is shown by the fact that the surplus amounted to 
M. 19,240.56 during the period under review. If these figurcs 
may be taken as a basis of calculation, this surplus should 
amount to nearly M. 40,000 by the end of the year. 

Why do not the gentlemen who disburse the Camp funds 
take us into their confidence? 

You obedient servant, 

L. E. FILMORE. 

(WE have received other letters on this subejct, but space 
prevents our Publishing them. The above, however, represents 
the opinion) expressed in the same.) 



To the Editor, 
Sir, 

Will you VERY kindly inform me 

1. Why you consider Bärrack 11 's chances at cricket so 
slight, that you have the damned impertinence to pat them on 
the back for good sportsman-ship — the usual consolation prize 
— before the season has been started, and before we have 
lost a match ? 

2. Why you favour Bar. 3's chances ? Do you think the 
presence of a lot of would-be actors, artists, authors and other 
sub-men in that Barrack will improve the form of its players ? 
Or are you in the team yourself? 

3. Whether you think that because Bar. 4 have the stamina 
to win a tug-of-war competition against a rotten Camp, it 
follows that they necessarily have the skill to win the cricket 
championship ? 

(Continued on^page 41) 



40 



PUBLISHERS' ANNOUNCEMENTS 

M BUTTE RW ORT HI ANA" or the Chairman's Vade mecum by 
"Butterskotch". 2 d. 

"The Compleat Chalrman" by W. Butterworth J. P. 6/- 

"Public Meetings, and the Function of the Chair" by W. B . 

J. P 6.6. 
"The Cheerful Chairman, or Chairmen I have succeeded" by 

W. B. 2 6. 

"The Chair" by Walther Butterworth J. P. £ 5-5-0. 
ALL PUBLISHED BY C ALLARD & BOWSER L™ 



"Art, thou shalt die" by Leigh Henry. Harmsworth Populär 
Library. 7 d. 

"Under two flags" by A Blake-Lee. 6/-. 

"Expected shortly (overdue) Apologia pro vita sua. N. G. Kapp 

"Kitchen-lnspector P — ke on Indigestion" half pigskin 2 d. 



THE BAUBBLE REPUTATION 

T\ ick Halpin was a Citizen of credit and renown: 

t*-* And didn't care a "bloody damn" for all in Lager Town. 

But once he was so foolish as to write a little book 
About a sojourn he had made in a dark and lonely nook. 

He took it to the Editor who listed it for sale: 

"In Darkest Cells" the title ran, and thereby hangs a tale. 

For when the Title so appeared, Dick's friends all shrieked with glee 
And tho' Dick damned with all his might — the joke he could not see. 

No peer had Dick in "s'perience" or in financial lore 

So knocked he next, with twinkling eye, upon our office door. 

"See here", quoth he, to T.A.B., what niean you by this here? 
To me, as much as any man, my reputation's dear. ,, 

"I'H raise old Hell for you and all that live in Lager Town 
Unless upon this "bloody spot" you straightway pay me down. 

"My honour's worth? (And here he leered with purpose feil and dark) 
"You're five" said he, "Give tuppence each, and make a bloody Mark." 

But T.A.B. is not so soft and easy to do in 

"Blackmail", said he "my good friend Dick, is a punishable sin." 

"Your book teils me that in its line you are with out equal: 
But if you do persist in this — you'll have to write a sequel." 

The logic of this argument Dick saw, and forthwith ran: 
He left the office door, I think, a sadder, wiser man. 

The Office Boy, 



41 

Letter a to the EditoT-Contd.\ 



4. What the Dickens the good of a first rate wicket- 
keeper is to Bar. 2 if they have no one to bowl straight to him ? 

Let me teil you, sir, that if the championship can be 
won, Bar. 11 is the Barrack to win it. 

Yours, 

ELEVENITE. 

S. S. I am neither the Chairman nor the Secretary of the 
Ruhleben Cricket Association. 

(We leave our sporting man to answer this, he's bigger than 
we are. — Ed.» 

Dear Sir, 

I should like to draw attention through your correspon- 
dence columns to the widespread dissatisfaction which seems to 
be feit in the Camp with regard to the so-called Entertainments 
Committee. 

How this body of men came into being nobody 
seems to know. However, they seem to have been given 
füll power over all the takings and expenditure of every Per- 
formance, dramatic or otherwise, given in the Camp, and more 
over, have the right to say whether a play is or is not suitable 
for production. 

As at present constituted this committee consists of six 
members ; three acting members of the Ruhleben Dramatic Society, 
two representatives of the professional music hall artists, and one 
independent outsider. Thus only two interests are rspresented 
by its members and while having every respect for the gentlemen 
in question, I do not think that they should be given control over 
other societies and their productions, about which their knowledge 
may be extremely small. If we must have an Entertainments 
Committee, for goodness sake let every interest be represented. 

Again, with regard to the proceeds of various Performances. 
The average gross takmgs of a successful show should be 
roughly M. 500, of which possibly M. 300 may be put down 
to expenses. Well, as we have a successful show every week, 
the profits should be something like M. 200 weekly ; and taking 
another possible M. 50 for various disbursements, we are left 
with M. 150 per week clear profit. What the Entertainments 
Committee intend doing with this weekly income, which by the 
way, is a none too generous estimate, is what many of us 
should like to know. If we are here for, say another six 
months, the Entertainments Committee should have a nice little 
balance of about M. 4000—5000 in hand. 

Yours etc. 

R. M. SMYLLIE, 

Bar. 21. 



42 



The 




PS 



July 15 th , 16 th , 17 th and 18 th . 

DONT MISS IT! 

Wonderful decorations! 

Splendid scenery! 

Grand costumes! 



86 



Produced by Grib. Conducfor: Peebles-Conn. 

PRINCIPLE CHÄRÄCTERS: » 

Count of Luxembourg . . Grib & Austin 



88 



86 



Angele Jaschon 

Brisard . Austin 

Juliette ........ Brannan 

Countess Kockoczan . . . Thorpe 

Prince Basil ..... Short 

Scenery by Weiz. 



43 



THE SECOND ÜARIETY SHOW. 

IN spite of a rather shaky first night and the loss of a 
lion's head, Mr. Tapp and his assistants easily eclipsed their 
former effort and gave us a very entertainmg evening. The 
turns were well mixed and were, with one excephon, quite 
uniformly good. The ventriloquial act was scarcely up to the 
Standard ; Mr. Stanford sesmed somewhat bored with his puppets 
and in this he had the sympathy of the audience. The tennis- 
players, however, (who didn't play tennis), Prof. Nelson, the 
Bros. Maurice cnd A. Underwood, Gus Barra and the Humpsty- 
Bumpsty pair would have satisfied a Saturday-second-house- 
audience in Shepherd's Bush or Peckham. 

The Sketch was an inconsistent trifle. It began with the 
broad elemental fun, which still, thank God, delights all normal 
persons ; but it tailed off into a rather clumsy exploitation of 
the erotic and expired confusedly on a side-track. Harry 
Stafford, as the assistant barber, was extremely funny, though 
there is still a touch of restraint about him, which he should 
try to get rid of. Archie Weiland was clever, but in his 
Salome-Dance his appeal to the audience was too masculine 
and insistent; he amused, but failed to charm. Underwood 
was a seductive little flapper. Percy Maurioe had but little 
opportunity in a poor part, while Alex. Boss did the traditional 
irascible Frenchman quite successfully. 

By the way, who did take that lion's head? One can 
understand a man laying covetous fingers on spoons or shaving 
soap, but the motive in this case is too obscure for normal 
understandings. Where are Mr. Butchart and the recently 
resuscitated Sherlock ? 

C. H. B. 



Why don't YOVJ shine at the Debate? 
Unanswerable arguments for every motion, 
and crushing replies to same; snubs ; stin- 
ging retorts, etc. etc. Supplied at shortest 
notice. R. Gument, Bar. 2. 



CLOTHES REPAIRED, DARNING, ETC. 
Neatly done. Durabiliiy guaranted. Read 
this testimonial: 'Dear Mr Thred. Early 
last December I had a pair of pants patched 
by you. Since then I have completely worn 
away the original materials but YOUR 
PATCHES ARE STILL AS GOOD AS NEW 
and worn by me throughout the late sun- 
bathing season. Yours B. Rason Fase. 



STOP! Don't throw away that old 
pocket handkerchiefl We can make com- 
plete sunbathing costumes from it. As worn 
on Spielplatz. Apply Wyldmann & Co. 

BIRKS' "PEERAGE". Who's Who in 
Ruhleben (and what they are outside). 
Giving genealogies and pedigrees of all 
celebrities in the Camp, with past Perfor- 
mances and sentences. To be issued shortly. 



GRUB. Are you writing home for par- 

cels? Then why not send a sketch portrait. 

Pinched and haggard expressions a spe- 

ciality. Bumping hamper results every time^ 

Penzel, Designer, Bar. 47* 



BINDING CASES for "In Ruhleben Camp" will hold from 90 to 100 fortnigh ly copies. 

For Ever & A. Dav, Bookbinders, Bar. 90. 



44 



RUHLEBEN GNATS. 

A little Rumour floating round upon the sunny air 
By chance arrived at Ruhleben from God alone knows where. 
And carried by an air-wave to a Scotsman s fertile brain 
On his imagination fed, and quickly waxed amain. 

And as it grew, it multiplied itseif in many forms 

Just like the Üttle polyps that the sea contains in swarms 

Un.il a hazy group of Rumours finally emerged 

An like the ocean swell upon the patient Camp they surged. 

Mosquito like they flew along from group to chatting group 
And left each one assuming they had really got a coup 
And soon the Camp was permeated fully, as with leaven, 
Till the stories in the Teehaus were discussed in Barrack seven. 

And wildly inconsistent were the various reports; 

Not tentative suggestions which were rieh in "shoulds" and "oughts" 

But marvellous assurances of awe-inspiring acts, 

Was ever such a horde before of self-destructive facts? 

You know, of course, the midges small that flourish for a day 
And dance upon the shimmring air and quickly pass away? 
Well, so it happened unto this mysterious Rumour-horde 
A heat wave came at close of day and washed them overboard. 

And when the shades of gathering night descended like a pall 

And in the sky the silver moon was watching over all 

Not one remained to tease the weak or victimise the strong, 

The Camp had settled down, — - until the next should come along! 

S. E. J. 



PERVERTED PROVERBS FOR PRISONERS. 

Tt's a long week that has no parcel. 

t's never too late to shave. 
A quid in the hand's worth two in the office. 
A rolling pin gathers no dough — in Ruhleben. 
It's a wise barrack that knows its own Captain. 
A tip in time saves 72. 

A watched man never smokes — in barracks. 
Be sure your non-com will find you out. 
Travel in haste and repent in — Ruhleben. 
Soap Springs eternal in the barrack sink. 

A. D. 



45 



WHAT OUR READERS THINK OF US. 

(The foliowing are extracts from a few of the many p. c's receiüed in response 
to our appeal for helpful criticism and suggestions.) 

"I likes your Journal very well, my dear. I bought up 
six copies at 20 Pfg. each. at 8 o/c and retailed them at 10 o/c 
after the edition was sold out at 40 Pfg. each. Cent per 
cent. Eh what ! — Yours, 

A. SILBERSTEIN. Bar. 6." 



"You will be pleased to hear, no doubt, that we have 
decided to give your admirable little paper a place on our 
Reading Room table,- will you therefore let us have half a 
dozen copies specially bound. — - 

MEMBER, THE WINTER HOUSE7 s 



"My dear Sir: On looking through your periodical, I saw 
to my astomshment several pages on which my name is not even 
mentioned. Now do bück up and see this doesn't occur again, 
there's a good fellow. R. de TEHR." 

"Dear Mr. Editor, — I like "In Ruhleben Camp" very much. 
If you publish this letter it will be my first time in pnnt. 
Thankmg you in anticipation. Yours sincerely, 

CONSTANT READER. 

P. S. I have read every number from the start." 



"I consider the magazine too flippant in character and 
too much space is allotted to lurid descriptions of mere ex- 
hibitions of physical prowess. One of my young friends (Mr. 
Ackel Ight) has written the enclosed charming essay Does 
barbed wire fix a limit to the ränge of one's imagmation'. 
You would be well advised to print this for it will raise 
the tone of your misguided periodical. 

P. REE. SHARD." 



"Honored Mister. What I've got ter say is this ere. 
Your paper' s alright as far as it goes, but it don't go no 
farther than a blamed Mother's Meeting Report. What us 
chaps wants is somethmg sporty and spicy. What about Latest 
Betting News ? What about tips for the Cricket Championship ? 
Aint there no blooming Scandal in this ere Camp ? Why, 
s'help me, theres a blöke what spars in Barney's Ring, that 
has the neatest left in Ruhleben and I aint so much as seen 
his name mentioned in your pappy rag. Yours disgustedly, 

"NO MAMMY'S DARLING." 



46 



1 DFFIC1AL | 

S «*..»•••«« «***»_«• (ö) 

n 

I 

® IllllUlllUVIUllkV fi 

a n 

m m 



TRADING STORES 



(ö) g 

§ Outfittina § 

8 Stores « 



B JDrj^ Stores 9 

m> - ^ (ö) 

fi Canteen g 

| Fond Stores g 

§ SPECIAL: 8 

Y*J A fresh consignment of Mixed Pickles at 50 Pfgs. WJ 

frj) per jar has arrived at the Canteen Stores, frü 

o a 

{} HYGIENE: g 

W A protector, of thin toilet paper, has been ordered (R) 

(Jti for laying on the seats of the new latrines. rt<\ 

U Price M. 1.10 per 100. n 

68 @ 

n o 



47 



HUHLEBEW CAMP SCHOOL. 

Its Work and the Spirit of its Endeavour. 

IT is now some months since the Camp was notified by the 
School Committee that the enforced leisure we are enjoying 
here would be able to be turned to profitable account — by 
Study. But since the 1100 Application Forms were sent in, 
little has been heardf of the School : this was due to the fact, 
that contrary to the Committee's expectations no accomodation 
was obtainable. 

A start, however, was made in Boxes and Loft Corners 
until some 30 classes were so formed, providing for some 300 
Pupils. With the arrival of warm weather, and the possibility 
of work being carried on the Third Grandstand, the number 
steadily mounted to about 50, and new classes are being formed 
daily; so that nearly 500 of the original applicants are being 
enabled to get tuition in some of the subjects they asked for. 

Further accommodation will shortly be placed at the Com- 
mittee's disposal, (the Loft of Barrack 6 is to be partitioned 
and used for Class-rooms) and the Committee hope soon to 
be able to deal with the great majority of the Applications re- 
ceived. 

To suggest more vividly the nature of the work done in the 
School, we may mention the following classes, chosen at hap- 
hazard : Dr. Blagden has a Marine Engineering Class for Extra- 
Chiefs Certificate, where some 30 engineers are preparing them- 
selves for this examination: Mr. Cooper is giving a series of 
practical lectures on the Diesel Engines to about the same 
numbers of pupils : Mr. Pennington has an equally large class 
in Mathematics : and Elementary Physics are being taught by 
Messrs. Smith and Edge. Commercial Training is not being 
neglected and Shorthand and Bookkeeping Classes have been 
set going. Spanish classes are being taken by Messrs. Eager, 
Kirkham, Balfour, & Heather: French classes are very nume- 
rous and Russian, Dutch, Italian and English Classes are 
bringing rapidly forward quite large numbers of Students. Mr. 
Bodin is taking one group over the difficulties of the History 
of Philosophy; and Prof. Patchett, having discussed the Problem 
of the Freedom of the Human Will, has passed on to discuss 
(in German) the Philosophy of Goethe' s Faust with an au- 
dience of a good round 100. We must not forget to mention 
the large Physical Drill class that has been organised under 
the charge of Messrs. Dix, Sullivan, and Lucas. 

A. C. FORD, 

Chairman of the School Committee. 



48 



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